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Tonybet eu referendum

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The EU might agree to extend Article 50 if its leaders thought it would help smooth the process or if there was a chance the UK could end up staying in, possibly through another referendum, but it would only be by a few months.

That would also require Brexit day being pushed back from 29 March. Labour has kept open the option of pushing for another referendum, which would also need an extension.

Some government ministers have also been talking about asking the EU for an extension of a few weeks to get all the necessary legislation through Parliament.

It would have to be put into law by the government, which they have said they will not do. They could be forced into holding another referendum if enough MPs voted for it.

Dozens of Labour MPs want another referendum, as do a smaller number of Conservatives and most of the minor parties in the House of Commons.

But without the official support of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, who could order all Labour MPs to vote for it, those campaigning for another public vote say they do not currently have the numbers to get it through.

Mr Corbyn has not ruled out getting behind another referendum but he wants to explore other options, such as toppling the government and forcing a general election, first.

The main point of having a deal between the UK and the EU is to ensure as smooth as possible an exit from the EU for businesses and individuals - and to allow time for the two sides to hammer out a permanent trading relationship.

A page withdrawal agreement. It also proposes a method of avoiding the return of a physical Northern Ireland border. A page statement on future relations.

This is not legally-binding and sketches out the kind of long-term relationship the UK and EU want to have in a range of areas, including trade, defence and security.

It refers to a period of time after 29 March, , to 31 December, or possibly later , to get everything in place and allow businesses and others to prepare for the moment when the new post-Brexit rules between the UK and the EU begin.

It also allows more time for the details of the new relationship to be fully hammered out. Free movement will continue during the transition period, as the EU wanted.

The government fears this would cause significant disruption to businesses in the short-term, with lengthy tailbacks of lorries at the channel ports, as drivers face new checks on their cargos.

Food retailers have warned of shortages of fresh produce and the NHS is stockpiling medicines, in case supplies from EU countries are interrupted.

Government ministers and multinational companies with factories in the UK have also warned about the long-term impact on the British economy.

Here is a full explanation of what that would mean. She had planned to put it to the vote on 11 December but pulled it at the last minute because she was facing a big defeat.

She lost by votes. The deal is not dead, however. Mrs May survived an attempt the following day by Labour to oust her as prime minister, with all the Conservative MPs who had voted against her deal voting to keep her in power.

They say they want her to have another go at getting a better deal from the EU, something she had previously insisted was not possible.

Mrs May is trying to get a better deal from the EU. She wants to get changes to the legal text she agreed with the 27 other member states.

Most - including a bid to delay Brexit to prevent a no-deal departure - were defeated. MPs did back a call for the government to rule out a no-deal Brexit, but it was non-binding and Mrs May has repeatedly insisted that the only way to ensure no deal is to back a deal.

The key vote for the prime minister was when MPs backed a call to replace the controversial Northern Ireland backstop clause with "alternative" arrangements.

She has promised to return to the Commons by 13 February at the latest with fresh proposals, which will be put to the vote. MPs will again be able to suggest alternatives, including, for example, delaying Brexit or holding another referendum.

The EU has insisted it will not alter the legal text it has agreed with the UK and that the controversial Northern Ireland backstop is part and parcel of that.

The UK side hopes they will cave in at the last minute and agree to changes, when faced with the prospect of a no-deal Brexit.

Neither side wants to see a return to checkpoints, towers, customs posts or surveillance cameras at the border, in case it reignites the Troubles and disrupts the free cross-border flow of trade and people.

The UK and EU agreed to put in place a "backstop" - a kind of safety net to ensure there is no hard border whatever the outcome of future trade talks between the UK and the EU.

The backstop agreed between the two parties would keep Northern Ireland aligned to some EU rules on things like food products and goods standards.

That would prevent the need for checks on goods at the Irish border, but would require some products being brought to Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK to be subject to new checks and controls.

The backstop would also involve a temporary single customs territory, effectively keeping the whole of the UK in the EU customs union. If future trade talks broke down without a deal, the backstop would apply indefinitely.

The arrangement would end only with the agreement of both the UK and the EU. They fear it could leave Britain tied to the EU indefinitely with no say over its rules and no ability to strike trade deals with other countries.

If there was an obvious solution that people agreed guaranteed no return of a hard border in Ireland it would probably have been implemented by now.

However, Mrs May has said she wants to talk to the EU about possible alternatives. These include a "trusted trader" scheme to avoid physical checks on goods flowing through the border, "mutual recognition" of rules with the EU and "technological" solutions.

She also wants to discuss a time limit on the backstop and a "unilateral exit" mechanism. All of these options have previously been ruled out by the EU.

Theresa May was against Brexit during the referendum campaign but is now in favour of it because she says it is what the British people want.

She triggered the two year process of leaving the EU on 29 March, She set out her negotiating goals in a letter to the EU council president Donald Tusk.

She outlined her plans for a transition period after Brexit in a big speech in Florence, Italy. She then set out her thinking on the kind of trading relationship the UK wants with the EU, in a speech in March Theresa May is always in a precarious position because she lost her House of Commons majority in the general election.

She has survived two attempts to remove her from office so far. The first, in December , was from a group of her own MPs unhappy at her Brexit policy, who organised a no confidence vote in her as Conservative leader.

She survived by votes to She is now immune from another attempt to oust her as Tory leader until December The second was from the Labour Party, who held a no confidence vote in her government after her Brexit plan was voted down in January All MPs were able to take part in this and she survived by 19 votes.

Unlike the internal Tory no confidence vote, there is no limit to the number of times she could face a confidence vote in Parliament and Labour have not ruled out holding further ones.

Labour says it accepts the referendum result and that Brexit is going to happen. Leader Jeremy Corbyn says he would negotiate a permanent customs union with the EU after Brexit, which would be very similar to the one it has now.

This is the only way to keep trade flowing freely and protect jobs, he says, as well as ensuring there is no return to a "hard border" in Northern Ireland.

He has ruled out staying a member of the single market, as some of his pro-EU MPs want, so he can carry out his plans to nationalise key industries without being hampered by EU competition rules.

He says the UK should have a very close relationship with the single market. Labour accepts that some form of free movement of people might have to continue.

The proposal provides a cut-off date of Brexit day - 29 March - for those to be covered by the rules. Babies born after that date to people who have qualified under these rules will be included in the agreement.

Under the plan EU citizens legally resident in the UK and UK citizens in the EU will be able to leave for up to five years before losing the rights they will have as part of the proposed Brexit deal.

The UK government is launching an online system to allow EU citizens to apply for settled status on 30 March. Anyone who had already paid, when the scheme was being tested, will be reimbursed.

The current plan is that even after Brexit, people from the EU will be able to move to work in the UK during a "transition" phase of about two years.

There is also some debate over whether they will have the same rights as those who came before, with possible restrictions on access to benefits or to vote in local elections.

What exactly happens after the transition period has yet to be decided, but the proposal is for a work permit system along the lines of that for non-EU nationals see below.

Prime Minister Theresa May said one of the main messages she took from the Leave vote was that the British people wanted to see a reduction in immigration.

She has insisted the UK government remains committed to reducing annual net migration - the difference between the number of people entering and leaving - to below , Home Secretary Sajid Javid has declined to commit to this, however.

Instead, he has said it will be brought down to "sustainable" levels. Free movement of people from the EU will effectively continue until the end of the transition period in December After that, people from the EU will need visas to work in the UK, with priority given to skilled workers - the same system that currently applies to migrants from outside the EU.

However, tens of thousands of low-skilled migrants could come to the UK to work for up to a year to protect parts of the economy that rely on overseas labour.

That measure would last until Visitors from the EU will not need visas. Under the Brexit deal, EU citizens and UK nationals will continue to be able to travel freely with a passport or identity card until the end of the transition period in December After this period ends, the European Commission has offered visa-free travel for UK nationals coming to the EU for a short stay, as long as the UK offers the same in return.

It is a British document - there is no such thing as an EU passport, so your passport will stay the same. The government has decided to change the colour to blue for anyone applying for a new or replacement British passport from October If no trade deal is in prospect by July , the two sides could agree to extend the transition period instead.

This would avoid the need for the backstop at that time, and keep trade with the EU flowing as it does now. But there is no agreement on how long any extension would be.

International reactions to the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum. Aftermath of the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, Conservative Party UK leadership election, Labour Party UK leadership election, Proposed second Scottish independence referendum.

Economic effects of Brexit. Russian interference in the Brexit referendum. A long and rocky relationship".

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Retrieved 8 August Tory MP will take forward bill". Retrieved 5 July Retrieved 17 May Archived from the original on 23 October Retrieved 22 June Retrieved 28 May Green Party of England and Wales.

Retrieved 26 April Retrieved 16 May Retrieved 8 June Retrieved 12 June Retrieved 24 July Retrieved 29 June EU referendum, tax freeze and right-to-buy".

Retrieved 4 June Retrieved 9 November Archived from the original on 31 May Retrieved 24 September MPs support plan for say on Europe". Retrieved 9 January Retrieved 14 May Retrieved 2 February This content is released under the Open Parliament Licence v3.

Cameron sets June date for UK vote". Retrieved 24 December Retrieved 28 June Retrieved 30 January Retrieved 21 June UK goes to the polls".

Retrieved 23 June Thousands wrongly sent polling cards". Retrieved 15 February United Kingdom Electoral Commission. Retrieved 5 September Cameron accepts advice to change wording of question".

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Mike Nattrass via YouTube. Workers Party of Ireland. Retrieved 22 October Archived from the original on 20 March Retrieved 22 March Where Conservative MPs stand".

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We would love strong UK in strong EU". Retrieved 17 July Retrieved 18 March Retrieved 18 May Retrieved 27 February Retrieved 20 June Retrieved 13 May Saleheen, Staff Working Paper No.

Retrieved 14 June The Law Society of England and Wales. Britain should say adiEU in June". Dow Jones Financial News. Retrieved 7 March Event occurs at Retrieved 31 May I really do have no hesitation whatsoever in concluding that Leave conducted one of the most dishonest political campaigns this country has ever seen.

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Retrieved 24 November Retrieved 28 February Retrieved 8 February Retrieved 29 May Brexit would damage growth".

Retrieved 20 March Retrieved 12 September Better off out or in? Retrieved 3 March Analysis, BBC Radio 4.

Retrieved 4 March Retrieved 31 October As Brussels held its ground, Cameron dropped his manifesto commitment for new EU workers to wait four years before accessing benefits, as long as something was done to cut immigration.

Theresa May has won herself breathing space to charge back to Brussels and pursue what many senior EU figures have set their faces firmly against — reopening the withdrawal agreement and reworking the backstop.

Brexit Britain is now the only argument on Earth for rising sea levels Marina Hyde. Brexit absolutely must be delayed Jonathan Lis.

Theresa May is trying to bribe the people of Redcar. She can forget it Anna Turley. Stockpiles of despair at record levels after another week of Brexit John Crace.

Politicians have lost the plot. But lawyers still grasp Brexit realities Tom Clark. UK cities have been clobbered by austerity.

They need a champion Richard Vize.

Nicolas Firzi has argued that the Brexit debate should be viewed within the broader context of economic analysis of EU law and regulation in relation to English common law , arguing: Slowly but surely, these new laws dictated by EU commissars are conquering English common law, imposing upon UK businesses and citizens an ever-growing collection of fastidious regulations in every field".

The head of the IFS, Paul Johnson said that the UK "could perfectly reasonably decide that we are willing to pay a bit of a price for leaving the EU and regaining some sovereignty and control over immigration and so on.

That there would be some price though, I think is now almost beyond doubt. During a Treasury Committee shortly following the vote, economic experts generally agreed that the leave vote would be detrimental to the UK economy.

Michael Dougan , Professor of European law and Jean Monnet Chair in EU Law at the University of Liverpool and a constitutional lawyer, described the Leave campaign as "one of the most dishonest political campaigns this country [the UK] has ever seen", for using arguments based on constitutional law that he said were readily demonstrable as false.

Guidelines by the Charity Commission for England and Wales that forbid political activity for registered charities have kept them silent on the EU poll.

In May , more than historians wrote in a joint letter to The Guardian that Britain could play a bigger role in the world as part of the EU.

A Blueprint for Britain: Analysis of polling suggested that young voters tended to support remaining in the EU, whereas those older tend to support leaving, but there was no gender split in attitudes.

The Leave campaign argued that a reduction in red tape associated with EU regulations would create more jobs and that small to medium-sized companies who trade domestically would be the biggest beneficiaries.

Those arguing to remain in the EU, claimed that millions of jobs would be lost. Scenarios of the economic outlook for the country if it left the EU were generally negative.

The United Kingdom also paid more into the EU budget than it received. Citizens of EU countries, including the United Kingdom, have the right to travel, live and work within other EU countries, as free movement is one of the four founding principles of the EU.

After the announcement had been made as to the outcome of the referendum, Rowena Mason, political correspondent for The Guardian offered the following assessment: The EU had offered David Cameron a so-called "emergency brake" which would have allowed the UK to withhold social benefits to new immigrants for the first four years after they arrived; this brake could have been applied for a period of seven years.

The UK cannot possibly continue in its present form if England votes to leave and everyone else votes to stay". The scheduled debates and question sessions included a number of question and answer sessions with various campaigners.

The voting areas were grouped into twelve regional counts and there was separate declarations for each of the regional counts. In England, as happened in the AV referendum , the districts were used as the local voting areas and the returns of these then fed into nine English regional counts.

In Scotland the local voting areas were the 32 local councils which then fed their results into the Scottish national count, and in Wales the 22 local councils were their local voting areas before the results were then fed into the Welsh national count.

Northern Ireland, as was the case in the AV referendum, was a single voting and national count area although local totals by Westminster parliamentary constituency areas were announced.

Gibraltar was a single voting area, but as Gibraltar was to be treated and included as if it were a part of South West England, its results was included together with the South West England regional count.

The following table shows the breakdown of the voting areas and regional counts that were used for the referendum. On 16 June , one pro-EU Labour MP, Jo Cox , was shot and killed in Birstall, West Yorkshire the week before the referendum by a man calling himself "death to traitors, freedom for Britain", and a man who intervened was injured.

On polling day itself two polling stations in Kingston upon Thames were flooded by rain and had to be relocated. Although this was widely dismissed as a conspiracy theory, some Leave campaigners advocated that voters should instead use pens to mark their ballot papers.

On polling day in Winchester an emergency call was made to police about "threatening behaviour" outside the polling station. After questioning a woman who had been offering to lend her pen to voters, the police decided that no offence was being committed.

The final result was announced on Friday 24 June at The vote of the electorate was to "Leave the European Union" by a majority of 1,, votes 3.

Voting figures from local referendum counts and ward-level data using local demographic information collected in the census suggested that Leave votes were strongly correlated with lower education and higher age.

EU referendum vote by age and education, based on a YouGov survey. The referendum was criticised for not granting people younger than 18 years of age a vote.

Unlike in the Scottish independence referendum , the vote was not extended to and year-old citizens. Critics argued that these people would live with the consequences of the referendum for longer than those who were able to vote.

Some supporters for the inclusion of these young citizens considered this exclusion a violation of democratic principles and a major shortcoming of the referendum.

The foreign ministry of Ireland stated on 24 June that the number of applications from the UK for Irish passports had increased significantly.

There were more than a hundred reports of racist abuse and hate crime in the immediate aftermath of the referendum, with many citing the plan to leave the European Union.

No more Polish vermin". On 26 June, the London office of the Polish Social and Cultural Association was vandalised with graffiti that was initially characterised as a racist hate crime.

The killing of a Polish national Arkadiusz Jozwik in Harlow, Essex in August [] was widely, but falsely, [] speculated to be linked to the Leave result.

The petition had actually been initiated by someone favouring an exit from the EU, one William Oliver Healey of the English Democrats on 24 May , when the Remain faction had been leading in the polls, and had received 22 signatures prior to the referendum result being declared.

Healey also claimed that the petition had been "hijacked by the remain campaign". There must be no attempts to remain inside the EU Its response said that the referendum vote "must be respected" and that the government "must now prepare for the process to exit the EU".

On 24 June, the Conservative Party leader and Prime Minister David Cameron announced that he would resign by October because the Leave campaign had been successful in the referendum.

The leadership election was scheduled for 9 September. The new leader would be in place before the autumn conference set to begin on 2 October. The Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn faced growing criticism from his party, which had supported remaining within the EU, for poor campaigning.

This led to a string of Labour MPs quickly resigning their roles in the party. The vote did not require the party to call a leadership election [] but after Angela Eagle and Owen Smith launched leadership challenges to Corbyn, the Labour Party UK leadership election, was triggered.

Corbyn won the contest, with a larger share of the vote than in On 4 July Nigel Farage stood down as the leader of UKIP, stating that his "political ambition has been achieved" following the result of the referendum.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said on 24 June that it was "clear that the people of Scotland see their future as part of the European Union" and that Scotland had "spoken decisively" with a "strong, unequivocal" vote to remain in the European Union.

In reaction to the lack of a unified pro-EU voice following the referendum, the Liberal Democrats and others discussed the launch of a new centre-left political movement.

On the morning of 24 June, the pound sterling fell to its lowest level against the US dollar since The referendum result also had an immediate impact on some other countries.

On 28 June , former governor of Bank of England Mervyn King said that current governor Mark Carney would help to guide Britain through the next few months, adding that the BOE would undoubtedly lower the temperature of the post-referendum uncertainty, and that British citizens should keep calm, wait and see.

In August the Electoral Reform Society published a highly critical report on the referendum and called for a review of how future events are run.

Looking ahead, the society called for an official organisation to highlight misleading claims and for Office of Communications Ofcom to define the role that broadcasters were expected to play.

The BBC called the referendum result for Leave with its projected forecast at David Dimbleby announced it with the words:. The remark about was incorrect: On 9 May , Leave.

It was specified that among the organisations to be investigated was Cambridge Analytica and its relationship with the Leave.

In the run-up to the Brexit referendum, Prime Minister David Cameron suggested that Russia "might be happy" with a positive Brexit vote, while the Remain campaign accused the Kremlin of secretly backing a "Leave" vote in the referendum.

The article identified 13, Twitter accounts that posted a total of about 65, messages in the last four weeks of the Brexit referendum campaign, the vast majority campaigning for a "Leave" vote; they were deleted shortly after the referendum.

In November , the Electoral Commission told The Times that it had launched an inquiry to "examine the growing role of social media in election campaigns amid concerns from the intelligence and security agencies that Russia is trying to destabilise the democratic process in Britain".

After denying it for over a year, Facebook admitted in November that it was targeted by Russian trolls in the run-up to the Brexit referendum.

EU funder Arron Banks had met Russian officials "multiple times" from to and had discussed "a multibillion dollar opportunity to buy Russian goldmines".

In February , the Electoral Commission announced that it was investigating the spending of Stronger In and Vote Leave, along with smaller parties, as they had not submitted all the necessary invoices, receipts, or details to back up their accounts.

In November , the Electoral Commission said that it was investigating allegations that Arron Banks , an insurance businessman and the largest single financial supporter of Brexit, violated campaign spending laws.

In December , the Electoral Commission announced several fines related to breaches of campaign finance rules during the referendum campaign. In May , the Electoral Commission fined Leave.

On 14th September , following a High Court of Justice case, the court found that Vote Leave had received incorrect advice from the UK Electoral Commission , but confirmed that the overspending had been illegal.

Vote Leave subsequently said they would not have paid it without the advice. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, Please see the relevant discussion on the discussion page.

The page should not be moved unless the discussion is closed ; summarizing the consensus achieved in support of the move. Members — elected by parliament Members — election Members — election Members — election Members — election Members — election Members — election Members — election Members — election Women.

Article 50 and negotiations. European Union Referendum Act Campaigning in the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, For the positions of backbench MPs and other politicians, see Endorsements in the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, Opinion polling for the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum.

Issues in the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, Results of the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, International reactions to the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum.

Aftermath of the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, Conservative Party UK leadership election, Labour Party UK leadership election, Proposed second Scottish independence referendum.

Economic effects of Brexit. Russian interference in the Brexit referendum. A long and rocky relationship". Retrieved 2 June Retrieved 19 February EU referendum bill shows only Tories listen".

Retrieved 14 July Retrieved 3 January Parliament of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 8 August Tory MP will take forward bill".

Retrieved 5 July Retrieved 17 May Archived from the original on 23 October Retrieved 22 June Retrieved 28 May Green Party of England and Wales.

Retrieved 26 April Retrieved 16 May Retrieved 8 June Retrieved 12 June Retrieved 24 July Retrieved 29 June EU referendum, tax freeze and right-to-buy".

Retrieved 4 June Retrieved 9 November Archived from the original on 31 May Retrieved 24 September MPs support plan for say on Europe".

Retrieved 9 January Retrieved 14 May Retrieved 2 February This content is released under the Open Parliament Licence v3. Cameron sets June date for UK vote".

Retrieved 24 December Retrieved 28 June Retrieved 30 January Retrieved 21 June UK goes to the polls". Retrieved 23 June Thousands wrongly sent polling cards".

Retrieved 15 February United Kingdom Electoral Commission. Retrieved 5 September Cameron accepts advice to change wording of question".

Bercow insists he is neutral referee in Brexit debates. Speaker says his job is to give House of Commons freedom to breathe over EU departure.

Officials warn of putrefying piles of rubbish after no-deal Brexit. Gary Lineker and MPs pen reply to Germans. Labour MPs split over backing Theresa May in return for investment.

Theresa May has won herself breathing space to charge back to Brussels and pursue what many senior EU figures have set their faces firmly against — reopening the withdrawal agreement and reworking the backstop.

Brexit Britain is now the only argument on Earth for rising sea levels Marina Hyde. Brexit absolutely must be delayed Jonathan Lis. Theresa May is trying to bribe the people of Redcar.

She can forget it Anna Turley. MPs did back a call for the government to rule out a no-deal Brexit, but it was non-binding and Mrs May has repeatedly insisted that the only way to ensure no deal is to back a deal.

The key vote for the prime minister was when MPs backed a call to replace the controversial Northern Ireland backstop clause with "alternative" arrangements.

She has promised to return to the Commons by 13 February at the latest with fresh proposals, which will be put to the vote.

MPs will again be able to suggest alternatives, including, for example, delaying Brexit or holding another referendum.

The EU has insisted it will not alter the legal text it has agreed with the UK and that the controversial Northern Ireland backstop is part and parcel of that.

The UK side hopes they will cave in at the last minute and agree to changes, when faced with the prospect of a no-deal Brexit.

Neither side wants to see a return to checkpoints, towers, customs posts or surveillance cameras at the border, in case it reignites the Troubles and disrupts the free cross-border flow of trade and people.

The UK and EU agreed to put in place a "backstop" - a kind of safety net to ensure there is no hard border whatever the outcome of future trade talks between the UK and the EU.

The backstop agreed between the two parties would keep Northern Ireland aligned to some EU rules on things like food products and goods standards.

That would prevent the need for checks on goods at the Irish border, but would require some products being brought to Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK to be subject to new checks and controls.

The backstop would also involve a temporary single customs territory, effectively keeping the whole of the UK in the EU customs union.

If future trade talks broke down without a deal, the backstop would apply indefinitely. The arrangement would end only with the agreement of both the UK and the EU.

They fear it could leave Britain tied to the EU indefinitely with no say over its rules and no ability to strike trade deals with other countries.

If there was an obvious solution that people agreed guaranteed no return of a hard border in Ireland it would probably have been implemented by now.

However, Mrs May has said she wants to talk to the EU about possible alternatives. These include a "trusted trader" scheme to avoid physical checks on goods flowing through the border, "mutual recognition" of rules with the EU and "technological" solutions.

She also wants to discuss a time limit on the backstop and a "unilateral exit" mechanism. All of these options have previously been ruled out by the EU.

Theresa May was against Brexit during the referendum campaign but is now in favour of it because she says it is what the British people want.

She triggered the two year process of leaving the EU on 29 March, She set out her negotiating goals in a letter to the EU council president Donald Tusk.

She outlined her plans for a transition period after Brexit in a big speech in Florence, Italy. She then set out her thinking on the kind of trading relationship the UK wants with the EU, in a speech in March Theresa May is always in a precarious position because she lost her House of Commons majority in the general election.

She has survived two attempts to remove her from office so far. The first, in December , was from a group of her own MPs unhappy at her Brexit policy, who organised a no confidence vote in her as Conservative leader.

She survived by votes to She is now immune from another attempt to oust her as Tory leader until December The second was from the Labour Party, who held a no confidence vote in her government after her Brexit plan was voted down in January All MPs were able to take part in this and she survived by 19 votes.

Unlike the internal Tory no confidence vote, there is no limit to the number of times she could face a confidence vote in Parliament and Labour have not ruled out holding further ones.

Labour says it accepts the referendum result and that Brexit is going to happen. Leader Jeremy Corbyn says he would negotiate a permanent customs union with the EU after Brexit, which would be very similar to the one it has now.

This is the only way to keep trade flowing freely and protect jobs, he says, as well as ensuring there is no return to a "hard border" in Northern Ireland.

He has ruled out staying a member of the single market, as some of his pro-EU MPs want, so he can carry out his plans to nationalise key industries without being hampered by EU competition rules.

He says the UK should have a very close relationship with the single market. Labour accepts that some form of free movement of people might have to continue.

The proposal provides a cut-off date of Brexit day - 29 March - for those to be covered by the rules. Babies born after that date to people who have qualified under these rules will be included in the agreement.

Under the plan EU citizens legally resident in the UK and UK citizens in the EU will be able to leave for up to five years before losing the rights they will have as part of the proposed Brexit deal.

The UK government is launching an online system to allow EU citizens to apply for settled status on 30 March. Anyone who had already paid, when the scheme was being tested, will be reimbursed.

The current plan is that even after Brexit, people from the EU will be able to move to work in the UK during a "transition" phase of about two years.

There is also some debate over whether they will have the same rights as those who came before, with possible restrictions on access to benefits or to vote in local elections.

What exactly happens after the transition period has yet to be decided, but the proposal is for a work permit system along the lines of that for non-EU nationals see below.

Prime Minister Theresa May said one of the main messages she took from the Leave vote was that the British people wanted to see a reduction in immigration.

She has insisted the UK government remains committed to reducing annual net migration - the difference between the number of people entering and leaving - to below , Home Secretary Sajid Javid has declined to commit to this, however.

Instead, he has said it will be brought down to "sustainable" levels. Free movement of people from the EU will effectively continue until the end of the transition period in December After that, people from the EU will need visas to work in the UK, with priority given to skilled workers - the same system that currently applies to migrants from outside the EU.

However, tens of thousands of low-skilled migrants could come to the UK to work for up to a year to protect parts of the economy that rely on overseas labour.

That measure would last until Visitors from the EU will not need visas. Under the Brexit deal, EU citizens and UK nationals will continue to be able to travel freely with a passport or identity card until the end of the transition period in December After this period ends, the European Commission has offered visa-free travel for UK nationals coming to the EU for a short stay, as long as the UK offers the same in return.

It is a British document - there is no such thing as an EU passport, so your passport will stay the same. The government has decided to change the colour to blue for anyone applying for a new or replacement British passport from October If no trade deal is in prospect by July , the two sides could agree to extend the transition period instead.

This would avoid the need for the backstop at that time, and keep trade with the EU flowing as it does now. But there is no agreement on how long any extension would be.

Some have suggested the end of , but the government position has been for it all to be sorted before the next election, which is due in Spring There is uncertainty about what no deal would mean for Britons living in France, Spain, Germany and elsewhere.

The priority for most will be to register as residents, but the rules - including deadlines for paperwork - vary from country to country. The proposal - which will come into force on 29 March when the UK leaves the EU in the event of a no-deal Brexit - must be adopted by the EU Parliament and European Council before it can come into force.

No deal would mean the current reciprocal healthcare, shared by the UK and the EU27, would no longer apply. It could send health insurance premiums soaring for UK citizens who need sufficient cover for holidays or work in the EU.

The UK government can then decide over a period of time which ones it wants to keep, change or ditch. Every member state would have to agree to the UK re-joining.

But she says with elections looming elsewhere in Europe, other leaders might not be generous towards any UK demands.

New members are required to adopt the euro as their currency, once they meet the relevant criteria, although the UK could try to negotiate an opt-out.

In the twelve months to June , according to the Office for National Statistics, the number of non-EU citizens living in the UK on a long term basis rose by , By contrast the number of citizens from elsewhere in the EU rose by 74, In other words, the result of the referendum has already had an impact before Brexit has actually happened.

There is much debate about the long-term costs and benefits to the UK economy of Brexit - but what we do know for certain is that the EU wants the UK to settle any outstanding bills before it leaves.

But the calculation of an exact UK share will depend on exchange rates, on interest rates, on the number of financial commitments that never turn into payments, and more.

The UK says that if there is no deal agreed on Brexit it would pay substantially less and focus only on its "strict international legal obligations".

The UK could leave without any Brexit "divorce bill" deal but that would probably mean everyone ending up in court battles.

If compromise can be achieved, and if payment of the bill were to be spread over many years, the amounts involved may not be that significant economically.

Probably not, is the answer. It would depend on whether or not the UK decided to get rid of current safety standards. If there is a no-deal Brexit, drivers may need a GB sticker if they are travelling to an EU member state, even if their car has a Euro-plate a number plate displaying both the EU flag and a GB sign.

Predictions of immediate doom were wrong, with the UK economy estimated to have grown 1. The UK economy continued to grow at almost the same rate in although there was slower growth, of 1.

Inflation rose after June but has since eased to stand at 2. Annual house price increases have steadily fallen from 8. This is the lowest annual increase in prices for five years, but it is still higher than inflation so property continues to show "real terms" increases in prices.

How has business been affected by Brexit? A fall in the pound means exports get a boost as UK goods will be cheaper to buy in other countries, but some imported goods could get more expensive.

It is hard to tell.

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